Farlam Hall Hotel
Click Logo for direct link
to Relais & Chateaux site.
Go to Relais & Chateaux information.
 



Farlam Hall Hotel, Brampton, Cumbria. CA8 2NG Tel: 016977 46234

 

HOME | VIDEO | HOTEL INFORMATION | RESTAURANT | TARIFF | WEDDINGS | THE AREA | LOCATION
LAUNDRY COTTAGE | PICTURES |HISTORY
SPECIAL DATES AND RATES
BOOKING | CONTACT US

THE HISTORY OF FARLAM HALL

The manor of Farlam is written about as far back as 1428 but one of the first mentions of a "manorial house" is in 1579.

However the house as it is today is the work of a family called Thompson who did most of the alterations around 1824 and 1860. They created a house for their family and friends in an era of extreme wealth and privilege. Several generations would be in residence at any given time and treats for the younger members were a regular occasion. On birthdays a gardener would bring Phoebe, the donkey, into the billiards room to give rides indoors. A team of gardeners supplied the house with exotic fruits and flowers, most of the local girls worked in the house, and time and money were largely irrelevant to the family.

The family had their eccentrics including the last of the Thompsons to live here. She could not abide the heat and kept the house so cold it achieved the reputation as "The Coldest House in Cumbria". Family and friends would visit wearing as many clothes as they could and still sit down and the local doctor spoke of treating her with snow across the foot of her bed. As the family fortune was based on coal this was obviously through choice and she lived to be 92 so it did her no harm.

Their social set included many wealthy and inventive people including George Stephenson creator of the first "Travelling Steam Engine". This was later developed into The Rocket and it won 500.00 in 1829 for being the best steam locomotive in the world. The Thompson family later owned The Rocket and at one time the experimental track even ran through the garden of Farlam. It was finally pensioned off and eventually the Thompson family had it restored and in 1837 donated it to The Science Museum in London. Sadly as the coal mining in the area came to an end so did an era with massive changes for everyone. The younger members of the family in the 1960s did not want the house and the cost of its upkeep and so in 1962 it was sold and in 1963 started a new life as an hotel.

This was short lived with little or no investment and by 1973 the hotel was closed. We purchased the house in 1975 on June 4th and re-opened it a week later. Ignorance is bliss but luckily standards were different then and a basin in the room was a luxury. Over the years we have progressed from one private bathroom in the whole house, electric meters in all rooms, no heating, the original wiring and leaking roofs causing havoc every time it rained.

Every year, we said there can not be much left to do but every year brings new changes and improvements to make sure the house is as comfortable to guests today as it was to the guests who enjoyed the house and gardens in the 1800s.

 

HOME | VIDEO | HOTEL INFORMATION | RESTAURANT | TARIFF | WEDDINGS | THE AREA | LOCATION
LAUNDRY COTTAGE | PICTURES |HISTORY
SPECIAL DATES AND RATES
BOOKING | CONTACT US


 

All text and images on this website copyright Quinions Limited 2000 unless otherwise indicated in the html
Website by Martin Langford